Can I Make $1,000 Bucks Every Month in Dividends? (2024)

Can I Make $1,000 Bucks Every Month in Dividends? (1)

Dividends are the bread and butter of income investors. You don’t need to sell your assets or spend hours every day managing your accounts. Instead, dividend stocks simply generate income on their own.Putting together a portfolio that generates at least $1,000 in dividends each month takes some work, though. Here’s how to go about it.

For more help generating sufficient income through your investments, consider working with a financial advisor.

What Are Dividends?

Dividends are payments that a company makes to its shareholders. For example, say ABC Corp. issues a dividend of $0.50 per share. Someone who holds 1,000 shares of this stock would receive a check for $500.00.

Typically a company will issue these payments based on its profits. When it has made a lot of money, it will distribute some of that among its shareholders.

Companies do not have to pay dividends, although most do. Depending on the size of the firm, anywhere from 54% to 84% of companies issue dividend payments at least from time to time.

There is no legally mandated timetable for companies to make dividend payments. When a company does so is entirely at its own discretion, though members of a class of stocks known as “dividend aristocrats” tend to issue them on a regular schedule. Most payments are issued a quarterly basis.

Capital Needed for Dividend Investing

The No. 1 question people ask when it comes to income investing is, “How much will I need to meet my goals?” This is an excellent question. Unfortunately, the number can be pretty big.

Now, there’s no fixed amount of money you need to invest for dividends. It all depends on the yield of your investments, so understanding “yield” is pretty essential to understanding dividend investing. (Note that the definition below is how “yield” applies to stock dividends. In general, yield defines how much money an investment makes when you hold it rather than selling it.)

Yield is the amount that a stock pays in dividends per share based on that stock’s price per share. So, for example, say that ABC Corp. costs $100 per share. Let’s also say that the company pays an annual dividend of $5. This stock’s yield would be:

  • $5 / $100 = 0.05

This is a 5% yield. If you invest $100 into this stock, you will make $5 each year in dividends. By market standards, that’s quite good.

At time of writing, the S&P 500 paid an average yield of 1.37%. This means that across the market, on average investors receive back dividend payments worth about 1.37% of their initial investments. Fortunately, that’s lower than historic standards. Ordinarily the S&P 500 tends to have an average yield of around 2%.

So where does that leave us?

Let’s return to our formula. We want to make $12,000 per year on average in a market that pays approximately 2% in yield each year. This gives us the following formula:

  • $12,000 / X = 0.02

Solving for X, we get $600,000.

In a market that generates a 2% annual yield, you would need to invest $600,000 up front in order to reliably generate $12,000 per year (or $1,000 per month) in dividend payments.

How Can You Make $1,000 Per Month In Dividends?

Can I Make $1,000 Bucks Every Month in Dividends? (3)

Here are the steps you can take to build yourself a sufficient dividend portfolio.

If you’re ready to be matched with local advisors that can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

Look for $12,000 Per Year in Dividends

To make $1,000 per month in dividends, it’s better to think in annual terms. Companies list their average yield on an annual basis, not based on monthly averages. So you can make much more sense of how much you might earn if you build your numbers around annual goals as well.

So that’s the place to start. You’re looking to make $12,000 per year in dividends.

Find Dividend-Paying Stocks

The next step is to look for stocks that reliably pay dividends. Not every company issues a dividend payment, and of those not all of them are consistent.

You’re not looking for an occasional windfall. You want to companies with a history of making regular payments on a regular schedule. To do this, research stocks that have a strong history of making payments.The more consistent a company has been with its dividends in the past, the more likely it will continue to be in the future.

Look for Strong but Sustainable Yields

Remember, yield is the ratio of dividend payment to share price for any given stock. When you look at a stock’s yield, you want to balance two concerns.

On the one hand, strong yields mean that the stock pays more money relative to its share price. This is generally a good thing. If one stock has a yield of 3% and another has a yield of 1.5%, you will make more money per dollar invested in the former than the latter.

However, when a stock’s yield is too strong, that can be a sign of trouble.An unusually high yield can indicate that the stock’s price has recently fallen. Investors aren’t getting more money; in fact, capital gains investors are losing money. It can also indicate that the company is spending its money poorly, blowing the operating budget on shareholder value. Either of these issues (or others) signal that this company’s dividend payments may not be sustainable.

A good rule of thumb is to look for dividend payments that are strong, but not abnormally strong relative to the market overall. In recent history, the market has averaged around 2% yield per year. If you see a yield of 3% or 3.5%, that might be a great investment. If you see a yield of 5%, you might want to dig a little deeper.

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Start With Large Companies and ETFs

Generally speaking you can expect the best yield from larger, older companies. Historically firms listed on the S&P 500 tend to be the most likely to issue regular dividend payments, and they also tend to issue the largest dividend payments per-share.

You can also start by investing in dividend-oriented exchange-traded funds(ETFs). This has become an increasingly popular area for ETFs, and you can find many that are organized entirely around investing in stocks that make dividend payments. Often you can save yourself a lot of trouble by seeking out one ETF with strong historic performance instead of a portfolio of different stocks.

Reinvest Your Payments

The truth is that most investors won’t have the money to generate $1,000 per month in dividends; not at first, anyway. Even if you find a market-beating series of investments that average 3% annual yield, you would still need $400,000 in up-front capital to hit your targets.

And that’s okay. You don’t need to get there all at once. Instead, patiently reinvest your dividends as they come in the door. This will create compound returns, in which your payments then start generating their own payments. Over time you’ll find that your investment portfolio’s base capital can, indeed, grow to hit your target.

The Bottom Line

Making $1,000 per month in dividends will take patient investing – whether you’re buying stocks or funds – or a lot of up-front capital. But with the right mix of yield and patience, you can get there.

Dividend Investing Tips

  • You can never know too much about your investments. If you want to start pursuing dividend investing, take our crash course in how to calculate dividend yield. It’s an eye-opener.

  • A financial advisor will help you build a strong dividend portfolio. Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to three financial advisors who serve your area, and you can interview your advisor matches at no cost to decide which one is right for you. If you’re ready to find an advisor who can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

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Can I Make $1,000 Bucks Every Month in Dividends? (2024)

FAQs

Can I Make $1,000 Bucks Every Month in Dividends? ›

The truth is that most investors won't have the money to generate $1,000 per month in dividends; not at first, anyway. Even if you find a market-beating series of investments that average 3% annual yield, you would still need $400,000 in up-front capital to hit your targets.

How to make $5,000 a month in dividends? ›

To generate $5,000 per month in dividends, you would need a portfolio value of approximately $1 million invested in stocks with an average dividend yield of 5%. For example, Johnson & Johnson stock currently yields 2.7% annually. $1 million invested would generate about $27,000 per year or $2,250 per month.

How much can you realistically make with dividends? ›

The average dividend yield on S&P 500 index companies that pay a dividend historically fluctuates somewhere between 2% and 5%, depending on market conditions. 7 In general, it pays to do your homework on stocks yielding more than 8% to find out what is truly going on with the company.

How much do I need to invest to make $3000 a month in dividends? ›

If you were to invest in a company offering a 4% annual dividend yield, you would need to invest about $900,000 to generate a monthly income of $3000. While this might seem like a hefty sum, remember that this investment isn't just generating income—it's also likely to appreciate over time.

How much do I need to invest to make 2000 a month in dividends? ›

Stock investors who want to receive $2,000 per month in dividend payments first have to do some quick math. A dividend portfolio with stocks valued at $480,000 yielding 5% overall would produce $24,000 in annual dividends.

How much dividend stock do I need to make $1000 a month? ›

Look for $12,000 Per Year in Dividends

To make $1,000 per month in dividends, it's better to think in annual terms. Companies list their average yield on an annual basis, not based on monthly averages. So you can make much more sense of how much you might earn if you build your numbers around annual goals as well.

How much does it take to make $1000 a month in dividends? ›

For example, if the average yield is 3%, that's what we'll use for our calculations. Keep in mind, yields vary based on the investment. Calculate the Investment Needed: To earn $1,000 per month, or $12,000 per year, at a 3% yield, you'd need to invest a total of about $400,000. Calculation: $12,000 / 0.03 = $400,000.

Can you live off of dividend income? ›

It is possible to achieve financial freedom by living off dividends forever. That isn't to say it's easy, but it's possible. Those starting from nothing admittedly have a hard road to retirement-enabling passive income.

How much do I need to invest to make $500 a month in dividends? ›

Investment Calculations for Desired Dividend Earnings

To consistently earn $500 per month from dividends, you'll need to invest around $113,208 based on Realty Income's current dividend yield of 5.3%. This calculation is derived from dividing your annual dividend goal ($6,000) by the yield percentage.

What pays most dividends? ›

9 Highest Dividend-Paying Stocks in the S&P 500
StockTrailing annual dividend yield*
Crown Castle Inc. (CCI)5.9%
Pfizer Inc. (PFE)5.9%
Boston Properties Inc. (BXP)6.2%
Kinder Morgan Inc. (KMI)6.2%
5 more rows
Mar 29, 2024

How much to invest to get $4,000 a month in dividends? ›

But the truth is you can get a 9.5% yield today--and even more. But even at 9.5%, we're talking about a middle-class income of $4,000 per month on an investment of just a touch over $500K. Below, I'll reveal how to start building a portfolio that could get you an even bigger income stream than this today.

How much passive income is enough? ›

Living off passive income alone is feasible, but the amount needed depends on your lifestyle and expenses. Generally, financial advisors suggest having enough invested to generate 25 to 30 times your annual living expenses.

How much money do I have to invest to live off dividends? ›

How Much Money You Need to Retire on Dividends. As a rough rule of thumb, you can multiply the annual dividend income you wish to generate by 22 and by 28 to establish a reasonable range for how much you need to invest to live off dividends.

Are dividend stocks worth it? ›

Dividend investing can be a great investment strategy. Dividend stocks have historically outperformed the S&P 500 with less volatility. That's because dividend stocks provide two sources of return: regular income from dividend payments and capital appreciation of the stock price.

How do you get paid dividends every month? ›

You can earn monthly dividend income in a few ways:
  1. Buy an ETF that pays monthly.
  2. Buy a stock that pays monthly.
  3. Stagger quarterly paying dividend stocks.
Jun 15, 2023

How much to make $4,000 a month in dividends? ›

For example, if you have an investment or combination of investments with a 9.5% yield, you would have to invest $500,000 or more potentially. This is a high amount, but could almost guarantee you a $4,000 monthly dividend income.

How much do you need to invest to get $100 a month in dividends? ›

If you want to bring home an average of $100 per month ($1,200/year) in super safe dividend income, simply invest $13,800 (split equally, three ways) into the following ultra-high-yield stocks, which sport an average yield of 8.71%!

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